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Florida Corrections Officer Job Description

With eight facilities or field offices in Florida, the Federal Bureau of Prisons maintains a strong presence and provides a wide variety of corrections opportunities.  The BOP operates Community Corrections Management field offices in Orlando and Miami.  It also manages four medium security male Federal Correctional Institutions in Miami, Marianna, Tallahassee, and Coleman; there is an additional FCI at Coleman that is low security. A Federal Prison Camp is located in Pensacola that houses minimum security male inmates, while a Federal Detention Center is located in Miami which holds male and female defendants awaiting trial, deportation or transport to a permanent facility.  The Federal Correctional Complex in Coleman also includes two U.S. Penitentiaries which house high security inmates.  In total, the Federal Bureau of Prisons supervised 13,630 inmates in Florida during 2013.

The Florida Department of Corrections operates 140 prison facilities located throughout the state of Florida that are staffed with dedicated men and women who serve as correctional officers. The type of facility an offender is sent to is determined by his/her needs and security risk. These prisons only house persons sentenced to at least one year. Those with longer sentences are kept in county and city jails.

What it Means to be a Correctional Officer in Florida

In Florida, correctional officers are a prison’s front line. They are responsible for the supervision, care and control of inmates, including physical restraint when necessary. Correctional officers work one of three shifts (8:00 a.m. to 4 p.m., 4:00 p.m. to midnight and 12:00 p.m. to 8 a.m.) at any of the following duty posts:

  • Headquarters. Duties include handling large numbers of reports, forms, logs, etc., as well as issuing cleaning chemicals to orderlies.
  • Control Room. Monitors electronic door locks and issues all keys, radios, weapons, handcuffs and chemical agents. Handles computer, radios and telephone communication as well as the public address system. Prepares and maintains numerous reports and logs.
  • Perimeter. Patrols perimeter in a vehicle; maintains radio communication.
  • Receiving Gate. Searches all entering and exiting vehicles.
  •  Inside Security. Patrols all interior areas on foot.
  • Dormitory. Patrols dorm areas, searches inmates and their property. Prepares and maintains reports and logs.
  • Inside Grounds. Supervises inmates working on grounds. Issues, tools, equipment, lawnmowers, gasoline, etc.
  • Public Work Squad. Supervises inmates working on community projects such as highway-area trash collections.
  • Medical Escort. Drives inmates to medical facilities. Wears body armor.
  • Motor Pool. Supervises inmates working on prison vehicles.
  • Laundry. Handles inmate clothing/linens.
  • Food Services. Monitors eating areas; supervises kitchen workers.
  • Mail. Examines all incoming and outgoing mail and parcels.

Qualifications for Beginning a Career as a Correctional Officer in Florida

Federal Bureau of Prisons

The Federal Bureau of Prisons sponsors numerous correctional officers jobs in Florida at the GS-5 or GS-6 pay levels.  In order to join the BOP at the GS-5 level, candidates must possess these attributes

  • Have no felony or serious misdemeanor convictions
  • Be free from any crippling financial debts
  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Between 20 and 37 years of age
  • Physically capable of performing the following tasks
    • Dummy drag—cross 694 feet in less than three minutes while dragging a 75 pound dummy
    • Obstacle course—to be completed in less than 58 seconds
    • Climb and grasp—ascend a ladder and grasp an object within seven seconds
    • Stair climb—ascend 108 steps within 45 seconds while carrying a 25 pound weight
    • Run and cuff—run one quarter of a mile and handcuff an individual within 2 minutes and 35 seconds
    • Have a bachelor’s degree in any field; or
    • Have at least three years of experience in
      • Counseling
      • Commissioned sales
      • Management or supervision
      • Teaching
      • Child care
      • Security
      • Religious instruction

Candidates who possess one or both of the following qualifications are eligible for GS-6 jobs:

  • Graduate coursework equaling or exceeding nine semester hours or 14 quarter hours in
    • Social science
    • Law
    • Criminology
  • Have at least one year of full time experience in
    • Corrections
    • Law enforcement
    • Mental health care

Florida Department of Corrections

The minimum requirements for correctional officer jobs in Florida are:

  • At least 19 years old
  • U.S. citizen
  • High school diploma (or equivalent)
  • Valid Florida driver’s license
  • No felony convictions or misdemeanor convictions involving perjury or false statements
  • No dishonorable military discharge
  • Physically fit
  • Good moral character

Those whose applications are accepted will be fingerprinted and must successfully pass a drug screening, background investigation and medical examination. All new hires must satisfactorily complete an entry-level corrections officer training program administered by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.

How to Apply for a Job as Corrections Officer in Florida

Federal correctional jobs in Florida may be found at www.USAJobs.gov.  The application must be submitted along with digital copies of supporting documents like transcripts, resumes, and military service forms.

The telephone number for information regarding jobs or internships with the Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC) is 1-866-JOB-FDOC. Interested men and women can also get more information, fill out a short e-mail application, or submit a detailed online application by going to the FDOC website and clicking on “Contact Us.”

Information and applications are also available at any Department of Corrections personnel office for those interested in finding out how to become a corrections officer in Florida. The addresses and telephone number of these offices in various cities can also be found on the FDOC website.

Florida Correctional Officer Salaries

Federal Correctional Officers

Federal correctional officers may be rated GS-5.GS-6 or GS-7.  In 2012, the salary ranges for these pay grades were

  • General Schedule 5:  $31,315 – $40,706
  • General Schedule 6:  $34,907 – $45,376
  • General Schedule 7:  $38,790 – $50,431

State Correctional Officers

Annual salaries for the position of correctional officer in Florida are:

  • Trainee officer – $28,007.20
  • Certified officer – $30,807.92 to $45,033.82; an additional $2,500 for those working in Broward, Dade, Monroe or Palm Beach counties; an additional $1,200 for Okeechobee, Indian River or Martin counties.
  • $325 annual uniform/shoe allowance.
  • Incentive pay for continuing education.

Corrections Officer Salary in Florida

In 2012, the U.S. Department of Labor reported the median Florida correctional officer salary to be $36,630.

In Florida, correctional officers at various levels of seniority can expect the following salary ranges:

Correctional Officer:

  • Minimum: $29,031
  • Maximum: $41,640

Correctional Officer Sergeant:

  • Minimum: $30,773.76
  • Maximum: $44,855.28

Correctional Officer Lieutenant:

  • Minimum: $32,912.40
  • Maximum: $48,446.28

Correctional Officer Captain:

  • Minimum: $35,272.80
  • Maximum: $52,558.08

Correctional officers in Florida also receive the following competitive area differentials each year:

  • Cad Region 1: $2,499.84
  • Indian River County: $1,199.88
  • Martin County: $1,199.88
  • Okeechobee County: $1,199.88
  • St. Lucie County: $1,199.88

Shown here are some of the salary figures of corrections officers throughout Florida’s cities as provided by the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics:

Area name
Employment
Annual mean wage
Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach-Deerfield Beach FL Metropolitan Division
1410
57690
Gainesville FL
680
35270
North Port-Bradenton-Sarasota FL
290
42880
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford FL
2640
38770
Panama City-Lynn Haven-Panama City Beach FL
450
34100
Pensacola-Ferry Pass-Brent FL
1790
36320
Port St. Lucie FL
680
40410
Punta Gorda FL
380
37890
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater FL
2360
47550
Northwest Florida nonmetropolitan area
3170
35810
South Florida nonmetropolitan area
1370
36800

Daytona Beach, Florida Corrections Officer Job Description

Daytona Beach, Florida, located in Volusia County, is home to the Tomoka Correctional Institution and was established in 1981. This complex is under the management of the Florida Department of Corrections and also includes:

  • The Tomoka Work Camp
  • The Daytona Beach Work Release Center
  • The Reality House

As of 2013, this complex had a staff of 383 and a maximum inmate capacity of 1,263. This all-male correctional facility has six open bay housing units and two cell housing units that house inmates of close, medium, minimum, and community custody grades.

Becoming a Florida State Correctional Officer at the Tomoka Correctional Institution

All candidates for Florida State corrections officer jobs must:

  • Be at least 19 years old
  • Possess a valid driver’s license
  • Be a United States citizen
  • Be able to complete a basic abilities test
  • Be able to pass a medical examination
  • Possess a high school diploma or GED
  • Have no felony convictions or misdemeanor perjury convictions
  • Pass the State Officer Certification exam
  • Complete basic recruit training

Many candidates for Florida State correctional officer jobs complete a post-secondary degree program. Whether pursuing an associate or bachelor’s degree, candidates with their career goals set on becoming a correctional officer often earn a degree in one of the following areas:

  • Criminal justice
  • Criminology
  • Sociology
  • Public administration
  • Police science

Within a Florida State correctional facility, correctional officers may work at a number of posts, such as:

  • Headquarters security post
  • Control room post
  • Perimeter post
  • Receiving gate post
  • Inside security post
  • Dormitory post
  • Inside grounds work squad post
  • Confinement of post
  • Disciplinary squad/public work squad post
  • Medical escort post
  • Motor pool post
  • Laundry post
  • Food service post
  • Mail post

Correctional Officer Job Duties at the Tomoka Correctional Institution

Individuals with their sights set on working in Daytona Beach, Florida, at the Tomoka Correctional Institution must be hired through the Florida Department of Corrections. Job duties for correctional officer jobs with the DOC include:

  • Supervising inmates within housing units and within segregation
  • Instructing inmates in housekeeping and sanitation
  • Periodically patrolling inmate quarters and work areas
  • Initiating counts of inmates and regular and irregular intervals
  • Maintaining control and discipline
  • Preventing the introduction of contraband into the institution
  • Checking inmates for contraband
  • Patrolling the inside or outside of the institution to ensure the security and integrity of the facility
  • Monitoring and supervising inmate visitations
  • Observing traffic in and around the facility
  • Instructing inmates and maintaining control in all areas of the facility, including the food service area, the auditorium, etc.
  • Counseling inmates regarding domestic, institutional, or emotional problems
  • Maintaining the proper security of inmates being transported

Jacksonville, Florida Corrections Officer Job Description

The Florida Department of Corrections, in FY2011-2012, had about 100,000 inmates and 23,000 employees. The Florida DOC saw nearly 33,000 admissions, and more than 34,000 releases that year. Other notable statistics during the same period included:

  • The Florida prison population decreased 1.8 percent (1,792) from the prior fiscal year.
  • Florida’s recidivism rate was about 30 percent.
  • There were 93,579 males – or 93.1 percent of the prison population – housed in Florida’s prisons.
  • Of every 100,000 residents in Florida, 527 were incarcerated.
  • The top 5 offenses for incarceration were: drugs (17.4 percent); burglary (16.2 percent); murder/manslaughter (13.7 percent); robbery (13.4 percent); and violent personal offenses (11.9 percent).
  • The Department of Corrections has 143 facilities throughout the state.

How to Become a Federal Correctional Officer in Jacksonville

Jacksonville is part of the Central Florida Judicial District, which is designated as Region 2 by the DOC. The Coleman Federal Correctional Complex (FCC), which is located in Region 2, includes the following facilities:

  • USP Coleman I: A high-security U.S. penitentiary: Inmate population (as of May 2013): 1,459
  • USP Coleman II: A high-security U.S. penitentiary: Inmate population (as of May 2013): 1,658
  • FCI Coleman Low: Inmate population (as of May 2013): 1,824
  • FCI Coleman Medium: Inmate population (as of May 2013): 1,616

Individuals who want to learn how to become a correctional officer at one of the region’s federal correctional facilities must meet the minimum requirements for employment, as set forth by the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Candidates must be no older than 37, unless they have previous federal civil service experience. Further, they must have specific education and/or experience requirements:

  • A bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university; OR
  • At least 3 years of experience performing a job that includes one or more of the following:
    • Educating/instructing
    • Managing/supervising
    • Counseling
    • Responding to emergency situations
    • Selling products or services

How to Become a State Correctional Officer in Jacksonville

As of June 2012, there were 32,281 incarcerated individuals housed in Region 2’s 17 major correctional institutions, 6 prison annexes, 11 work camps, 4 work release centers, and 4 contract work release centers.

The state correctional facilities located in Region 2 include:

  • Putnam CI
  • Mayo Annex
  • Reception and medical Center – West
  • Reception and Medical Center – Main
  • Marion CI
  • Lowell Reception Center
  • Lowell CI
  • Hamilton CI
  • Hamilton Annex
  • Lowell Annex
  • Lawtey CI
  • Florida State Prison – West
  • Florida State Prison
  • Lancaster CI
  • Lake City CF
  • Madison CI
  • Union CI
  • Tomoka CI
  • Suwannee CI
  • Suwannee Annex
  • Cross City CI
  • Columbia CI
  • Columbia Annex
  • Baker CI

A state corrections officer job description in Jacksonville requires that a candidate:

  • Is at least 19 years old
  • Is a United States citizen
  • Possess a valid driver’s license
  • Possess a high school diploma or a GED

Further, candidates for correctional officer jobs in Jacksonville must pass a medical examination, background examination, and a basic recruit training academy course.

Miami, Florida Corrections Officer Job Description

The Florida Department of Corrections ranks among the three largest prison systems in the United States, with 143 facilities and a budget of nearly $2.4 billion.

The Department of Corrections is responsible for overseeing the State’s:

  • 1 boot camp
  • 13 privately operated work release centers
  • 15 annexes, 33 work camps
  • 20 DOC-operated work release centers
  • 48 major correctional institutions
  • 6 road prisons and forestry camps
  • 7 private correctional institutions

The majority of the DOC’s 23,700 employees are correctional officers or probation officers. There are currently 100,272 (as of August 2012) inmates in its 60 state prisons.

In addition to state correctional facilities, Florida is home to 6 federal correctional institutions:

  • FPC Pensacola
  • FCI Marianna
  • FCI Tallahassee
  • FCC Coleman
  • FDC Miami
  • FCI Miami

Federal Corrections Officer Job Requirements in Miami

Individuals who want to learn how to become a federal correctional officer in Miami must meet the Bureau of Prisons minimum requirements for employment. Candidates for entry-level (GS-05) correctional officer jobs in Miami must:

  • Be no older than 37, unless they have previous experience in a civil service federal position; AND
  • Possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university; OR
  • Possess at least 3 years in one of the following areas:
    • Guidance/counseling
    • Teaching/instructing
    • Managing/supervising
    • Responding to emergency situations
    • Selling in a commission-based environment

State Corrections Officer Job Requirements in Miami

For would-be correctional officers in Miami, the minimum requirements are as follows:

  • Be a United States citizen
  • Be at least 19 years old
  • Possess a valid driver’s license
  • Be a high school graduate or possess a GED certificate
  • Have no felony or misdemeanor convictions involving giving false statements or perjury
  • Have no dishonorable discharge from the United States military
  • Pass a medical examination
  • Pass a background investigation

All new correctional officers must complete a basic recruit training course for correctional officers upon being hired.

A Closer Look at Miami State and Federal Correctional Institutions

Miami is part of the Southern Judicial District of Florida, which is considered Region 3 of the DOC. As of June 2012, there were 16 major institutions, 2 private facilities, 3 annexes, 10 work camps, and 13 release centers.

The state correctional institutions of Region 3 include:

  • Zephyrhills CI
  • Sumter CI
  • South Florida Reception Center – South
  • South Florida Reception Center
  • South Bay CF
  • Polk CI
  • Okeechobee CI
  • Moore Haven CF
  • Martin CI
  • Lake CI
  • Homestead CI
  • Hernando CI
  • Hardee CI
  • Everglades CI
  • Desoto Annex
  • Dade CI
  • Charlotte CI
  • Central Florida Reception Center – South
  • Central Florida Reception Center – Main
  • Central Florida Reception Center – East
  • Avon Park CI

The federal correctional institutions located within Region 3 include:

  • Federal Detention Center (FDC) Miami: Administrative facility for both male and female inmates
  • Federal Correctional Institution (FCI) Miami: Low security facility for male inmates; adjacent satellite prison camp houses minimum security make offenders

Pensacola, Florida Corrections Officer Job Description

In addition to being known for its direct route to the Gulf of Mexico (via the Pensacola Bay) and its pristine beaches, Pensacola is the site of both a federal prison camp and a state correctional facility:

  • Federal Prison Camp (FPC) Pensacola: This Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) prison camp is a minimum-security facility that is located on an outlying base of the Pensacola Naval Air Station. It currently houses about 753 inmates.
  • Century Correctional Institution: The Century Correctional Institution, which is managed by the Florida Department of Corrections, also includes the Century Work Camp, the Pensacola Work Release Center, and the Berrydale Forestry Camp. The Century Correctional Institution, which was established in 1991, has a staff of 377 and a maximum inmate capacity of 1,345. This Florida State facility features a number of inmate programs, including:
    • Substance abuse programs
    • Chaplaincy services
    • Institutional betterment programs
    • Faith-based character/self-betterment programs
    • Community work squads

Minimum Requirements to Become a Federal Correctional Officer in Pensacola

To become a federal correctional officer with the BOP and work at FPC Pensacola, individuals must be able to meet the minimum requirements of either the GS-5 or GS-6 level:

GS-5: Individuals must possess a bachelor’s degree or at least three years of full-time general experience in areas such as counseling, teaching, supervising, selling, or responding to emergency situations.

GS-6: Individuals must possess at least 9 semester hours of graduate-level study in one of the following areas:

  • Criminal justice
  • Criminology
  • Social science
  • A closely related field, such as law

To qualify at the GS-6 level through experience, individuals must possess at least one year of full-time experience performing duties that are directly related to:

  • Work in a correctional or mental health care facility that includes ensuring that individuals obey all rules and regulations
  • Responding to domestic disturbances
  • Apprehending and arresting individuals

Typical jobs where the above would apply may include: correctional officers, detention officers, police officers, border patrol agents, sheriffs’ deputies, and mental health residential facility workers.

Requirements to Become a Florida State Correctional Officer in Pensacola

To become a Florida State correctional officer so as to work for the Century Correctional Institution, individuals must:

  • Be at least 19 years old
  • Be a United States citizen
  • Possess a high school diploma or the equivalent
  • Have no felony convictions
  • Have no dishonorable discharge from the U.S. Armed Forces

Many individuals pursuing careers as correctional officers choose to complete a degree to better position themselves for job opportunities and future advancement. Typical degree programs sought by individuals in this field include:

  • Sociology
  • Psychology
  • Criminal justice
  • Criminology

New corrections officers with the Florida Department of Corrections must complete a basic recruit training course for correctional officers to be eligible for an employment certificate issued by the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission.

Sumterville, Florida Corrections Officer Job Description

Sumterville is a small town in Central Florida that has made a name for itself due to the location of a Florida State correctional center and a large federal correctional complex. The Federal Bureau of Prison manages the Coleman Federal Prison complex located here, which consists of:

  • FCI Coleman Low: A low-security federal correctional institution; 1,811 total inmates
  • FCI Coleman Medium: A medium-security federal correctional institution with an adjacent minimum-security satellite camp; 2,095 total inmates (1,626 at the FCI, 469 at the camp)
  • USP Coleman I: A high-security U.S. penitentiary; 1,525 inmates
  • USP Coleman II: A high-security U.S. penitentiary; 1,425 total inmates

How to Become a Federal Corrections Officer in Sumterville, Florida

Candidates seeking correctional officer jobs with the Federal Bureau of Prisons so as to serve at the Coleman complex in Sumterville must be United States citizens between the ages of 21 and 36 at the time of appointment.

They must also be able to meet the requirements of the GS-5 federal level, the minimum level at which they hire BOP correctional officers. Individuals may meet this requirement through either education or experience:

Meeting the GS-5 requirement through education: Candidates for federal correctional officer jobs may meet the requirements of the GS-5 level if they possess a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, in any area.

It is commonplace for individuals seeking careers in federal corrections to pursue a bachelor’s degree in areas related to the behavioral sciences, social sciences, or law. Many individuals pursue degrees in criminal justice and criminology, as well.

Meeting the GS-5 requirements through experience: Candidates for federal corrections officer jobs who do not possess a post-secondary education may also qualify if they possess at least three years of experience working as a:

  • Teacher
  • Counselor
  • Mental health counselor
  • Daycare worker
  • Emergency medical responder
  • Firefighter
  • Nurse
  • Welfare/social worker
  • Parole/probation worker
  • Clergyman
  • Commissioned sales
  • Security guard

Florida State Correctional Officer Jobs in Sumterville

Florida Department of Corrections correctional officer jobs in Sumterville are found at the Sumter Correctional Institution. This facility, which was established in 1965, currently houses adults and youthful offender male inmates. Also under the supervision of Sumter Correctional Institution are the Sumter Basic Training Unit, which houses youthful male inmates, and the Sumter Work Camp.

As of April 2013, the Sumter Correctional Institution had 401 inmates and a maximum capacity of 1,701. This correctional facility features a number of inmate programs:

  • Academic programs
  • Vocational programs
  • Basic training unit programs
  • Youthful offender programs
  • Chaplaincy services
  • Re-entry program

How to Become a Florida State Corrections Officer in Sumterville

Individuals who want to work as a Florida State corrections officer at the Sumter Correctional Institution must be able to meet the requirements of the Florida Department of Corrections, which include:

  • Being at least 19 years old
  • Being a United States citizen
  • Possessing a valid driver’s license
  • Possessing a high school diploma or GED
  • Being free of any felony convictions or misdemeanor perjury convictions
  • Passing a medical examination based on the specifications of the Commission
  • Having a good moral character
  • Passing a Basic Abilities Test (BAT) prior to entering a basic recruit training program
  • Completing a basic recruit training course for correctional officers
  • Passing the State Officer Certification exam

All new State correctional officers must successfully complete basic training and pass the State Officer Certification exam before they can achieve an employment certification of compliance through the Criminal Justice Standards and Training Commission to become a sworn officer.

Tallahassee, Florida Corrections Officer Job Description

As of June 2012, the Florida Department of Corrections operated the third largest prison system in the nation, with a $2.1 billion budget, about 100,000 inmates, and more than 145,000 offenders on community supervision.

The Florida Department of Corrections is responsible for managing 143 facilities, which includes 48 major facilities, 7 privately run prisons, 15 prison annexes, 33 work camps, and 20 state-run work release centers.

In FY2011-2012, there were 32,279 new admissions into Florida’s correctional facilities and 34,463 releases. There are about 23,000 employees within the Department of Corrections, the majority of which are either probation officers or correctional officers.

In addition to state correctional facilities, there are 6 federal correctional institutions in the state:

  • FCC Coleman
  • FCI Marianna
  • FCI Miami
  • FCI Tallahassee
  • FDC Miami
  • FPC Pensacola

How to Become a Correctional Officer in Tallahassee

Federal Corrections Facility Requirements

Learning how to become a correctional officer in Tallahassee at the federal level requires a specific set of minimum requirements for entry-level (GS-05) employment:

  • Candidates must be no older than 37, unless they have previous federal civil service experience.
  • Candidates must either have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university or at least 3 years of experience doing one of the following:
    • Supervising or managing others
    • Selling products or services on commission to others
    • Counseling others
    • Responding to emergency situations
    • Teaching or instructing others

Individuals interested in attaining GS-06 level correctional officer jobs in Tallahassee must have graduate-level education experience or specialized experience in the social sciences or in criminal justice.

State Corrections Facility Requirements

Individuals interested in becoming a correctional officer in Tallahassee through one of the state’s correctional institutions must meet the Department’s minimum employment requirements:

  • Candidates must be a United States citizen.
  • Candidates must be at least 19 years old.
  • Candidates must have no dishonorable discharge from the United States military.
  • Candidates must hold a high school diploma or GED.
  • Candidates must pass a medical examination and a background investigation.
  • Candidates must possess a valid driver’s license.

Training requirements for correctional officer jobs in Tallahassee include the completion of a basic recruit training course upon being hired.

Tallahassee State and Federal Correctional Facilities

Tallahassee is part of the Northern Judicial District of Florida, which is designated as Region 1 under the DOC. As of June 2012, there were 15 major institutions in Region 1, along with 4 private facilities, 7 annexes, 11 work camps, 3 work release centers, and 1 contract work release center.

The correctional facilities of Region 1 include:

  • Walton CI
  • Wakulla CI Annex
  • Wakulla CI
  • Taylor CI
  • Taylor Annex
  • Santa Rosa CI
  • Santa Rosa Annex
  • Quincy Annex
  • Okaloosa CI
  • Northwest Florida Reception Center Annex
  • Northwest Florida Reception Center
  • Liberty CI
  • Jefferson CI
  • Jackson CI
  • Holmes CI
  • Gulf CI – Annex
  • Gulf CI
  • Graceville CF
  • Gadsden CF
  • Franklin CI
  • Century CI
  • Calhoun CI
  • Blackwater River CF
  • Bay CF
  • Apalachee West CI
  • Apalachee East CI

The federal correctional facilities located in Region 1 include:

  • FPC (Federal Prison Camp) Pensacola: Minimum security facility for male inmates
  • FCI (Federal Correction Institution) Mariana: Medium security facility for male inmates; adjacent satellite prison camp houses female inmates
  • FCI Tallahassee: Low security facility for female inmates; adjacent detention center houses administrative security level male inmates

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